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CosmosUp | December 13, 2019

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Scientists Discover Black Hole 'P13', a Very Hungry Black Hole!

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Scientists Discover Black Hole ‘P13’, a Very Hungry Black Hole!

A certain black hole is more insatiable than expected. The P13 is a black hole along the outer edge of the NGC7793 galaxy located around 12 million light years away from the Earth. It’s very luminous compared to others of its kind but as it turns out, this has nothing to do with the black hole’s size.

P13 is eating a star faster than scientists had thought was possible, and it’s unleashing unusually bright X-ray signals that may help scientists understand a group of weird, superbright objects in deep space.

P13 is the most ravenous black holes in the universe are more like 128-pound Japanese eating champion Takeru Kobayashi than they are like hungry (and huge) sumo wrestlers. It eats the equivalent of 100 billion billion hot dogs every minute.

Researchers noticed P13 was more luminous than other black holes – when gas falls towards a black hole it gets very hot and bright. Researchers found that P13 is about a million times brighter than the sun. At first, astronomers thought it was just bigger than other black holes, astronomer Roberto Soria said:

“It was generally believed the maximum speed at which a black hole could swallow gas and produce light was tightly determined by its size. So it made sense to assume that P13 was bigger than the ordinary, less bright black holes we see in our own galaxy, the Milky Way.”

 After measuring mass of P13, Dr. Soria and his colleagues found that it was actually smaller than previously assumed, despite being million times brighter than the Sun.

Dr. Soria said that after analyzing the mass of P13, they realized how much material the black hole was actually consuming. There is no set limit for black holes, they can consume as much gas as they want and produce more light.

In addition, Soria said P13 rotates around a supergiant ‘donor’ star, which is twenty times bigger than our own Sun. Also, P13 is a member of a select group of black holes known as ultraluminous X-ray sources.

These new findings suggest that stellar-mass black holes growing at super-Eddington rates could help explain “a majority of ultraluminous sources,” Motch said. However, some ultraluminous X-ray sources are too bright to be stellar-mass black holes, even assuming super-Eddington rates of growth, or the wavelengths of X-rays they give off are consistent with growth rates below the Eddington limit. These other ultraluminous X-ray sources “may be powered by high-mass stellar black holes up to 100 solar masses, or by intermediate-mass black holes,” Motch said.

The study “A mass of less than 15 solar masses for the black hole in an ultraluminous X-ray source” was led by University of Strasbourg’s Dr. Christian Motch.

Source: http://goo.gl/v4r3lf



Comments


  1. Denis Zehovoy

    Only 4% of matter in the universe is subject to known physics laws. The rest is yet to be figured out if ever.


    • BGriffin

      Your estimate of 4 percent would seem to rely heavily on the remaining 96 percent being subject to the known laws of physics.
      Even estimates about the limits of knowledge should be subject to a requirement of self consistency.


  2. Denis Zehovoy

    I wish it was my estimate… scientists calculated that over 75% of the observable universe is dark energy, and an additional 20% being dark matter. Although they can calculate the presense of dark matter and dark energy, they have no clue how is everything strutured ( famous fish-scientist experiment). Our conventional physics laws do not work when applied to these two phenomena. So, even though we can figure out the presence of these two forces using physics, thats how far we have gone so far.


  3. Abdelkrim

    It seems that may be all small size black holes if accompanied with donor stars are ultraluminous X-ray sources and would be eating in a super-faster rate since the matter ripped of the donor star(s) would be closer to black hole’s singularity which should be exercising the strongest possible pull compared to larger lack holes in which case there exist layers upon layers of fast rotating matter hurdling towards the singularity playing a delaying role in the process of swelling new matter into the black hole ..


  4. Abdelkrim

    (type free version, I hope)

    It seems that may be all small size black holes if accompanied with donor stars are ultraluminous X-ray sources and would be eating at a super-faster rate since the matter ripped of the donor star(s) would be closer to black hole’s singularity which should be exercising the strongest possible pull compared to larger black holes in which case there exist layers upon layers of fast rotating matter hurdling towards the singularity playing a delaying role in the process of swallowing new matter into the black hole ..

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